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Offline Prodigal  
#1 Posted : Friday, March 19, 2010 9:35:56 AM(UTC)
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I'm only into the Unleavened Bread chapter of Book 2, so maybe this is covered later, but I hadn't run across anything yet, so here goes:

Quote:
Speaking of the corruptive nature of this fungus, God would go on to say: "Indeed (kiy - because), any and every (kol) soul (nepesh) who consumes (‘akal - eats and feeds upon, is nourished by) yeasted food (hames - bread which includes yeast and has become soured) shall be cut off and separated (karat -banished, cut down, severed, and uprooted; will face death and destruction upon being eliminated) from (min) Yisra’el (‘ys sarah ‘el - individuals who strive, struggle, persist, endure, and persevere with and are empowered by God), from the first (ri’sown) day (yowm) until (‘ad) the seventh (shabiy’iy) day (yowm)." (Exodus 12:15)


I remember from the radio shows (in the Galatians debate) that Yada mentioned circumcision being required based on similar wording, but I know I've ignored Unleavened Bread in the past and I'm positive I've eaten yeasted food during most, if not all of those days, so are we striving in vain? My reasoning being that if we miss one of these, we've been separated from the family.

Is it as easy as starting to observe this to be welcomed back to the family (or adopted in the first place)? Similarly, with circumcision, if it's done later than 8 days old, is it still sufficient? My hunch is yes to both.

I've also read in one of these discussions about the difference between observing the Miqra'ey (sp?) (something I'd love to start and think would be relatively easy to convince my wife to share with me) and performing the Miqra'ey in their entirety (somehow I don't think she'd be happy with me tossing 8+ loaves of bread, 20 boxes of cereal, etc). I understand the difference and I understand that acting them out is a good reminder and demonstration of what Yahuweh has done and continues to do for us, but I'm having trouble discerning what He's asking of us. I'm relatively new to all this, so it may just be my confusion. Anyways, I remember Ken saying something about the differences between Israel and the rest of us (Israel should be acting and reading the lines, while the rest of us are watching and learning, was the gist of it). Is it specifically Israel (blood relations back to Abraham) or all of Yahudah (including us adopted kids) that should be doing the acting?

Another thing I was thinking while reading was that if Yahushua died on Passover, and rose on First Fruits, what happened to the other 5 days between the two? Isn't First Fruits the last day of Unleavened Bread?

Thanks in advance.
Offline James  
#2 Posted : Friday, March 19, 2010 11:25:32 AM(UTC)
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Prodigal, most all of us ignored or were unaware of Unleavened Bread, until recently. Now that we are aware of it, it is incumbent upon us to study and understand it, acting it out is important in that we learn from performing it. Just as circumcision has a symbolic importance, and while we should have our children circumcised on the eight day because that is what Yah asked, Abraham was a grown adult when he was circumcised.

When it comes to Unleavened Bread, the important thing is to understand that the yeast is symbolic of sin and corruption, so as Ken pointed out in another thread, more important than removing every spec of yeast from your house would be to do a self assessment and try to remove sin from your life. Abstaining from yeasted bread for a week is a good way to remind you of it, and practicing it, not in a mindless way, but understanding it and performing it go hand in hand.

In my view understanding the meaning is more important than following them ritualistically. But once you come to understand them, or even before, you will benefit from performing them. The degree to which you take it is up to you. If you have children you might take it further, so that you can use it as a teaching aid, then you might if it is just you and your wife. Two adults can understand the meaning of it quite easily, where as for children taking them through the process of removing yeast and explaining it to them as you go can be very helpful and informative. Just as Yahushua said the the Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath, the Miqra are the same. They were given for our benefit, following them and understanding them helps us to learn about Yahuweh and our relationship with Him. They serve to teach us.

For myself, I abstain from eating or buying yeasted items for the week. If there happens to be a half a loaf of bread in the cabinet, I don't throw it away, but I don't eat it, if I had children I might take it a step further and take the bread explaining it to them, and either throw it away, or remove it from the house, so that I can teach them. It's all very personal between you and Yahuweh.

Also I think your timing is a little off. Passover occurs, then the next day starts the week of Unleavened Bread, and then the second day of Unleavened Bread is First Fruits. So there was not 5 days between Passover and First Fruits.

Hope this was helpful.
Don't take my word for it, Look it up.

“The truth is not for all men but only for those who seek it.” ― Ayn Rand
Offline kp  
#3 Posted : Friday, March 19, 2010 12:22:01 PM(UTC)
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James explained the timing thing, but let me hit it again, relating it to the Passion week to help you get a handle on it. Friday, the 14th of Nisan (which began on Thursday at sunset) is Passover. Yahshua was crucified as the lambs for the feast were being slaughtered---on Friday afternoon, making John the Baptist's proclamation ring true: He is "the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world." Sundown Friday was the deadline for both the removal of leaven from the homes and the slaying of the lambs: the two things are equivalent.

Saturday, Nisan 15 (beginning at sundown on Friday night) was the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread. The Torah designates this as a Sabbath, and such was the literal case in 33. The condition of leaven-less homes was a fait accompli by this time. But this is a seven-day feast, the number being symbolic of completion or perfection. Of what? Of what having the leaven gone meant---the condition of sinlessness as a symbolic fact in the lives of Yahweh's children.

Sunday, Nisan 16 (which began at sundown after the Sabbath) marked the Feast of Firstfruits. This of course is prophetic of the resurrection of Yahshua ("the firstborn of the dead"), which happened precisely on schedule. This feast falls on the second day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread---that is, within the context of the achievement of our sinless status before God.

Never let it be said that Yahweh is making this stuff up as He goes along.

kp
Offline Prodigal  
#4 Posted : Friday, March 19, 2010 1:04:01 PM(UTC)
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Thanks for the help. I guess I was under the impression that it went Passover -> Unleavened Bread -> First Fruits, with First Fruits either being the last day of Unleavened Bread or the next day.
Offline Bubsy  
#5 Posted : Saturday, April 19, 2014 11:20:32 AM(UTC)
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Prodigal wrote:
I remember from the radio shows (in the Galatians debate) that Yada mentioned circumcision being required based on similar wording, but I know I've ignored Unleavened Bread in the past and I'm positive I've eaten yeasted food during most, if not all of those days, so are we striving in vain? My reasoning being that if we miss one of these, we've been separated from the family.

Is it as easy as starting to observe this to be welcomed back to the family (or adopted in the first place)? Similarly, with circumcision, if it's done later than 8 days old, is it still sufficient? My hunch is yes to both.


I would concur that the consumption of yeasted bread during Unleavened Bread in past years is one of the sins that would be removed when one starts to observe the Miqra'ey as part of engaging in Yahowah's Covenant. One would only consume yeasted bread during Unleavened Bread out of ignorance, if he didn't know of Yahowah's Torah and Feasts, or out of intentional rebellion if he did know. Either way, that sin would certainly keep one from Yahowah.

This also puts into doubt in my mind when Yada wrote, "once saved, always saved". It seems to me that one could still blow it by eating a bacon cheeseburger during Unleavened Bread, or missing Yom Kippurym in a subsequent year if he dropped his guard. I recall reading somewhere in the material on the site about Yahowah saying he would blot out of the Book of Life those who sinned against him. I suspect either of those two would constitute blotting-out offenses, and necessitate starting over.
Ha Shem? I'm kind of fond of Ha Shemp, Ha Larry, and Ha Moe myself. And the earlier shorts with Ha Curly.
Offline James  
#6 Posted : Monday, April 21, 2014 8:18:52 AM(UTC)
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Keeping matsah perfect and being circumcised are apples and oranges. One must be circumcised before they can participate in the covenant, Yah is clear as day on that, but Yah does not say or imply that we must keep the Miqray 100% perfect to benefit from them.

I can't tell you how many times I have messed up and ate yeasted bread during Matsah, I think I did better this year than in past. Yah kept the Miqray perfect so we don't have to.

There is this idea, a left over from religion I think, that Yah is kind of sitting there waiting for a reason to kick someone out of the family. The opposite is true. Yah is looking for those who want to join the family. His requirements for that are simple and easy, and perfectly keeping the miqray isn't part of it.

"Once saved always saved" isn't completely true. You can, theoretically, come to know Yah, accept Yah's covenant and then later decide to knowingly reject it. I don't know why anyone would ever make this choice, but free will still exists and they could. That said once you have come to know Yah and accept Yah's covenant, your salvation is secure until you choose to reject it. Yah will not kick you out of the family because you grabbed a burger during matsah, or ate some tortilla's you didn't realize were made with yeast.

This is the difference between observe and keep. Yah instructs us to observer the miqra, not to keep them let alone keep them perfectly.
Don't take my word for it, Look it up.

“The truth is not for all men but only for those who seek it.” ― Ayn Rand
Offline Richard  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, April 22, 2014 11:19:52 AM(UTC)
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But I, Richard, say ...

Sorry. Couldn't help that. A question did occur to me this year, and that is, "What about using cornstarch?" My understanding is that it is indeed a type of yeasting agent, but it is also a common ingredient in baby powder, which both my wife and I use regularly. My usage is based on advice from my PCP, so I was unwilling to stop using it. We don't eat the stuff, so what does the Family think about that?
Offline Mike  
#8 Posted : Monday, May 5, 2014 5:56:30 AM(UTC)
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Hi Richard,

I don’t see where corn starch is used as a leavening agent itself, it can be an ingredient in baking powder acting as a drying agent but it is not the leavening agent. Corn starch is used as a thickening agent in soups, sauces, and gravies not a leavening agent. Corn starch is used as an anti-caking agent in baby powder and powdered sugar. Corn starch comes from corn (zea mays) which is indigenous to the Americas. Corn (zea mays) wasn’t introduced to Europe, Africa, or Asia until after Columbus in 1492 CE. Therefor the Israelites didn’t have corn or corn starch 3500 years ago on the first Pesach.

This is the same point that I make about baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) and baking powder (sodium bicarbonate + monocalcium phosphate) leavening agents. These are chemicals that weren’t available until after 1800 CE so the Israelites didn’t have them 3500 years ago on the first Pesach.

Shalom
Offline Richard  
#9 Posted : Monday, May 19, 2014 7:18:18 AM(UTC)
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Thank you, Mike.
Offline Sarah  
#10 Posted : Monday, May 19, 2014 9:34:39 AM(UTC)
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Richard,

I can't seem to play the SM Archives on Bless Yahowah.com I get a message saying my computer can't "find the file" ??

Offline Bubsy  
#11 Posted : Monday, February 15, 2016 12:59:02 PM(UTC)
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I have an observation on unleavened bread. I still have the last box of a 5-pack I bought ahead of Passover/Unleavened Bread/Firstfruits in 2015. And the unleavened bread in it is still good and edible now, 10 or 11 months later as I write. I know from previous experience that if I had bought a loaf of leavened bread around that time and forgotten about it until now, it would be all green and moldy, with who knows how many "science experiments in progress" in it. The unleavened bread, by contrast, has not gone bad. And when I want to flavor it a bit with salt, it tastes pretty good by spreading some olive oil on it, then sprinkling salt over it. Symbol-rich, and tasty too.
Ha Shem? I'm kind of fond of Ha Shemp, Ha Larry, and Ha Moe myself. And the earlier shorts with Ha Curly.
Offline Bubsy  
#12 Posted : Monday, June 26, 2017 5:27:18 PM(UTC)
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Some further observation and putting pieces together - I seem to recall that leavening yeast was also referred to as "embittering yeast", and Yada referred to yeast as being symbolic of religion and politics. These days, it's really hard to miss how embittered those on the political left, including most mass media, have become over Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton, and continue to be bitter during his presidency. Muslims are legendary for how bitter they become at any perceived slight to their religion or to Muhammed. Even adherents to the various Christian denominations are known to take offense when their religion is questioned. I also seem to recall that in Hebrew, there is an expression for someone angry or enraged that describes them as "leaven-baked". That certainly fits all those religious and political characters I mentioned, and no doubt many more. But those who engage in the Covenant do trust Yahowah and can easily enough let go of religion and politics, and the influence does indeed get removed, as the seven days of Unleavened Bread symbolizes.
Ha Shem? I'm kind of fond of Ha Shemp, Ha Larry, and Ha Moe myself. And the earlier shorts with Ha Curly.
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